eMetrics Social San Francisco

eMetrics SocialSocial Media Metrics
Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, consumer generated content – it’s enough to make you want to either jump in and play without regard to metrics (experimentation is good!) or simply stick to your knitting and do the best you can with the traditional media you have. Neither of these is optional. With marketing dollars so tight, it is critical to determine the value of all emerging media. From reach, frequency and awareness to sentiment analysis and influence graphing, this track is guaranteed to be the most tweeted.

Moderator:

Monday, April, 15, 10:20am – 10:30am •Room: Salon 1 & 2

Gold Sponsor Presentation

Monday, April, 15, 10:30am – 11:15am •Room: Salon 1 & 2

Social Media Metrics Secrets

John is a renowned analytics expert who wrote the book on social media metrics. He shares his best insights on how to analyze and measure the effects of social media and gauge the success of your initiatives. Through case studies and a massive amount of common sense, John demonstrates how to manage social operations with process and technology by applying key performance indicators, and assessing the business value of social media. He also details his techniques for adopting a Social Analytics Framework for understanding evolving consumer behavior necessary to compete in a socially networked future.

Monday, April, 15, 11:20am – 12:05pm •Room: Salon 1 & 2

Building a Measurement Organization for the Big Data World

Sir Tim Berners-Lee recently said, “Change is getting faster.” As the customer journey continues to fragment, as data, screens, apps and platforms proliferate, the strain on organizations is starting to show. How can business respond to external signals when social data is locked within silos, interpreted in myriad ways and sometimes even conflicts with enterprise data? In this session, Susan discusses how high-performance companies are organizing for social data, how they are integrating it, what challenges they’re facing and how they are addressing the cultural impact of a faster, more fragmented, data-driven world. It’s time to get your social business house in order. Here’s how.

Monday, April, 15, 1:30pm – 2:15pm •Room: Salon 1 & 2

Measuring Community Health

After working on the vendor side at Radian6, Lauren has put her social analytics knowledge to work at Aetna. Her goal? Monitoring the health of Aetna’s various customer-facing communities. Social listening started as pure art and now, Lauren shares how she’s applying the science.

Monday, April, 15, 2:20pm – 3:05pm •Room: Salon 1 & 2

Integrated Social Analytics at FedEx

Likes per campaign? Re-tweets per community manager? Comments per blog post? All are valid and all are useful but what about social analytics from an Enterprise perspective? How does a large organization cross-leverage the efforts of many, active, corporate social media participants? Brand impact, sentiment analysis and yes, bottom line sales are all up for consideration. Ned reviews his efforts, his progress as well as some of his trials and tribulations as he strives to get a top-down analysis of social media’s impact at FedEx.

Monday, April, 15, 3:30pm – 4:15pm •Room: Salon 1 & 2

The Community Manager’s Best Friend: You and Twitter & Facebook Analytics

Community Managers (virtually unheard of a few years ago) are now legion and need to a) determine if the work they are doing is working and, b) validate their existence. You can become an analytics hero armed with the right kind of Twitter and Facebook data. Tim offers up edifying Twitter case studies, an educational knowledge of Facebook Insights and presents a process for working with a community manager to drive an iterative test-and-learn process. All these will help when you discover the Facebook party line doesn’t always square with Facebook reality and some retweets are more equal than others.

Wednesday, April, 17, 10:20am – 11:10am •Room: Salon 1 & 2

Augmenting Forecasting with Social Media Data

Building predictive models is a great way to drive better reporting AND cross over the barrier from reporting to analytics and traditional forecasting is significantly enhanced with Social Media research. Gary shows the essential elements in building a product launch or campaign forecast, including modeling of historical, econometric, sales, and brand data. But he takes this well beyond the traditional modeling realm by showing how Social Media sharpens forecasts and creates predictions in areas where little historical data exists. Learn how to move your reporting from building thermometers (what happened) to building barometers (what will happen).

Wednesday, April, 17, 11:15am – 12:00pm •Room: Salon 1 & 2

The Social Media Metrics Journey

You can’t do everything, all at once. So where do you start? Nancy describes the how Social Media has evolved at Vail Resorts beginning with monitoring social channels (and measuring that). She tells about the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat when it comes to promoting via social channels (and measuring that), rolling out their own social/mobile app (and measuring that) and driving Social Media strategy from a content and promotions perspective using web data usage. Nancy has been through the practical, tactical side of implanting a variety of strategies – and you can learn from her experience.

Wednesday, April, 17, 1:30pm – 2:15pm •Room: Salon 1 & 2

Analytics of the Future: Best Methods for Social Media ROI Today and Tomorrow

Helping business leaders understand how social media impacts brand health requires baselining the long-term impacts of overriding campaigns and overlaying specific, social events. Sometimes popular, short hand calculations to calculate Customer Lifetime Value can be useful, but these methods have flaws. Natalie and Brian review various means of measuring social media ROI from cutting edge approaches to media mixed modeling to simplified calculation methods and outlines the benefits of each. Then, they take a look at the transformation analytics will make in the next few decades, from influencing business decision makers to actually owning the decisions.