The worst part about companies being divided up into silos is not the lack of shared messaging.

Although that is a tremendous loss of opportunity.

The more coordinated the outbound messages, the more impactful those messages can be in the marketplace.

The worst part about companies being divided up into silos is not the lack of shared data.

Although that is a tremendous loss of opportunity.

The more an organization can share information about customers, the better it can serve them.

The worst part about companies being divided up into silos is not the lack of an ability to hear.

Although that is a tremendous loss of opportunity.

The more a company can listen to the marketplace, the better it can hone its messages, products and services to accommodate that market.

The worst part about companies being divided up into silos is that ownership is local, personal and Balkanized. When ownership is not shared, when goals are not shared, when the organization does not act in support of itself, it competes internally and cannot properly serve its customers. Instead, individuals within silos do their best to prove their own worth rather than making it a team effort, to the detriment of customer service.

My ox was gored this morning by the New York Review of Books. Hey, @nybooks this is nothing personal – whoever you are, however many of you there are. No, I was annoyed by those hard working people in your direct mail department.

You see, my wife loves your publication; ‘The premier literary-intellectual magazine in the English language.’ Unfortunately, her subscription just ran out. Luckily, it’s almost Christmas! Perfect. She left a little hint on my desk at home – a Business Reply Mail blow-in card from her last issue. Is she great or what?

The card is a classic.
New York Review of Books BRC

It is such a classic, that it has
no URL and
no phone number

DON’T CALL US and WE WON’T CALL YOU!

La La La La La La, What? I can't hear you!

DON’T CLICK
DON’T CALL
DON’T PURSUE!

So it’s off to the website (thank you Google) to find the phone number (thank you web people for making that a one click endeavor) and call the nice lady at the subscription center (the work of a moment – well done call center!).

Why, oh why didn’t the direct mail people simply give me that URL and that phone number on that subscription card?

Silos.
[sigh – low]

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